Frank V Moccia, age 57

Bloggers honor the innocent victims of that awful day…

For some people, it’s about the numbers: 4 planes. 4 targets. 2,996 victims. 4 years and 10 months. 1,763 days. 42,312 hours. 2,538,720 minutes.

For others, like me, it’s about the people. Every victim was, at the very least, a son or daughter. Many were parents, grandparents, siblings, etc… Many of the victims themselves were related to each other. Each one represents a void in many lives, where new memories aren’t made and old ones are the only thing that stands in the way of insanity.

Our dearest friends lost their daughter, Heather Lee Smith, on Flight 11. These people live with a grief that is so vastly different, in a world that has been forever changed. Their loss is marked every year by an entire nation – that can be a great comfort but also a terrible intrusion. But in the 9/11 memorial services they have organized all over the Northeast, they honor their losses while celebrating the lives of their loved ones. I have had the privilege of attending these ceremonies in Boston and I’ve seen the youth and potential that was lost. Yet I’ve also seen the powerful resilience of the families, capable of laughter in the midst of great sorrow.

They possess the ability to turn their tragedy into community action and they have, in immeasurable ways. Memorial scholarships will pave the way for hundreds of students to pursue an educational path they might not otherwise have been able to afford. Foundations have been set up to shepherd a victim’s dearest cause to a higher profile. Charitable organizations will benefit from the largesse of friends and family for generations to come. In their grief, these families and friends are ensuring that the memories of their loved ones are not lost to time, but rather that they endure thru the lives of countless others.

As our great nation moves further away from the events of 9/11/01, I see us forgetting what we felt in the days and weeks that immediately followed. That sense of unity of purpose, that feeling of brotherhood, of belonging to something larger than ourselves. And I worry that in the process of forgetting, we will lose part of what makes us a great nation – our ability to be compassionate for our fellow man, to extend ourselves past our immediate world and recognize that sometimes we need to make sacrifices to ensure our safety.

We can’t afford to forget 9/11/01 – for the sake of our country’s future. The victims of 9/11 deserve the same respect from all of us that their families and friends give to them. They are, and should remain, a reminder of what the world could look like. Their deaths should not divide us they should unite us as they did in the days and months after 9/11. So that we never forget their sacrifice; so that we make certain the world we caught a glimpse of that horrible morning will never become a reality. We must honor them and remember them.

Frank V. Moccia, age 57

Place killed: World Trade Center. Resident of Hauppauge, N.Y. (USA).

Frank V. Moccia will be honored by Carlo at the blog I diavoli neri. This was the 1012th blogger to sign up for the 2,996 Tribute project.

 

Frank V Moccia, age 57
Frank V Moccia, age 57

By filling out and submitting this form, you are agreeing to create a tribute to a 9/11 victim on your blog. Your tribute can take any form you like — but please remember that the purpose is to honor the victim. You must fill out all the fields in the form above with valid information. Once you’ve completed and submitted the form, the system will randomly select one of the unassigned 9/11 victims. The key information about this victim will then be presented to you, and a copy will be emailed to you. Please record this information (or save the page). If you lose the information, you can always get it again by visiting the assigned victims page on the site.

8 comments

  1. watergate2000 says:

    ho capito, avevo letto male il commento del Master allora. Grazie :-), è una bella iniziativa.

  2. Bisqui says:

    Oti,

    si un Italoamericano, quando si dice il caso

    Wat,

    non sono random, ognuno di noi ne ricorda uno. Segui il link se vuoi partecipare

  3. CAMERATIANOI says:

    per quanto riguarda le foto del post precedente (non mi è possibile postare nel posto appropriato e lo faccio qui, spero di non fare cosa troppo sgradita ;O) ), penso che la differenza stia nel tipo di innesco che i due tipi di ogive hanno… le prime non hanno un innesco ad impatto, bensì quella fascetta bianca che si vede in cima all’ogiva altro non è che un innesco ritardato che permette al missile di entrare nella struttura colpita e solo dopo esservi entrata di deflagrare sventrandola dall’interno.

    Le ogive postate da te hanno innesco ad impatto.

    La differenza sta in questa distintinzione…

    complimenti per il blog veramente curato e ben fatto.

    C’è bisogno di raccontare la Storia per quello che è e tu se sulla strada buona.

    Alla prossima.

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